AddThis Social Bookmark Button

Click above to Bookmark this page for yourself and/or share it with your friends

Home

Click on the links below for "The Best" in:

Article Directory

Home & Herbal Remedies

Beating & Avoiding Cancer

Diets & Weight Loss

Healthy Recipes

Natural Living

Anti-Aging
& Longevity

Pets and Animals

Humor

Inspiration

The TBYIL Complete Supplement & Health Catalog

Links

Contact Us

If you would like to donate to help us keep this web site active and growing, click on the button above.   Much thanks! - Tony & Luella

The Best Years in Life Recommends:

Available Now!
Click on the image for more information

 

Make the rest of your years

The Best Years in Life

 

FDA Moving Closer to Precedent Setting Approval of Salmon 'Frankenfish'

by Tony Isaacs

The Food and Drug Administration appears to be close to approving the first genetically engineered animal for human consumption: salmon with cross species genes and an "always on" hormone switch that enable them to grow twice as fast. A large number of critics voiced concerns about the safety of bio-engineered salmon for consumers as well as wild salmon and the concern that approval will open the floodgates to a tide of other engineered animals.

Hearings on the safety of the new salmon may come as early as this fall. The FDA confirmed it was reviewing the salmon but, citing confidentiality rules, would not comment further

 

Anti-biotech organizations and other concerned scientists and critics are already alarmed over the possible dangers that genetically modified plants represent to the food supply and the environment, such as corn that produces its own pesticides and Monsanto's "Roundup Ready" seeds that produce plants able to withstand high applications of herbicide. In addition, alarm has been raised worldwide about the use of growth hormones in cows and other animals, with many countries banning such their use as well as imported growth hormone produced meat and milk.

The genetically engineered salmon has been developed by a company called AquaBounty Technologies. It is an Atlantic salmon that contains a growth hormone gene from a Chinook salmon as well as a genetic on-switch from the ocean pout, a distant relative of the salmon. AquaBounty contends that the fish will be safe for consumption and the environment, pointing out that they will be raised on fish farms with safeguards against their release and will be sterile too.

Others, including fish scientists, disagree and say it is inevitable that some of the superfish would escape into the wild and represent a threat to native salmon populations. The scientists also believe that a small percentage of the fish likely will be fertile and that wild salmon will try to mate with the larger fish regardless, depressing reproductive rates. Pacific Coast salmon are already struggling for sustainability due to dams, pollution, invasive species and loss of fresh water.

In 1999, Purdue scientists warned of risks from transgenic fish in the wild. The researchers found larger transgenic fish were more attractive mates and that the traits of transgenic fish would quickly spread through the wild population. Since transgenic fish offspring live shorter, the native population would eventually be wiped out. Widespread concern followed the study because in aquaculture, the escape of farmed fish is inevitable.

In Scotland and New Zealand, bio-engineered salmon efforts have been abandoned amid cries of "Frankenfish." Likewise, fear of consumer complaints has resulted in many salmon farming groups declaring that they will not use genetically engineered fish regardless of whether governments approve them. The International Salmon Farmers Association, which represents the vast majority of salmon farmers worldwide, has taken a strong stand against the engineered fish.

"Genetically engineered salmon is a solution looking for a problem," said Joseph McGonigle, executive director of the Maine Aquaculture Association. "Virtually everyone in the world has taken a position against them."

"A chemical spill, as terrible as it is, can often be contained and its damage dilutes over a period of time," said Joseph Mendelson, legal director for the Center for Food Safety. "It's the exact opposite for these transgenic fish. They can escape and mingle with the native populations, pass on genetic traits, and their presence will just continue to grow and grow. You can't reverse it."

While salmon farmers have denied interest publicly, AquaBounty co-founder Elliot Entis said, "There's not a salmon company in the world that hasn't talked to us privately.".

Sources included:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/26/business/26salmon.html
http://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/InNews/calamity2004.htm
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/chronicle/archive/2002/04/29/MN155761.DTL

    

Your hosts Tony Isaacs and Luella May

Click here to visit our CureZone Health Forum: Ask Tony Isaacs: Featuring Luella May Natural Health, Cancer, Longevity and Home & Herbal Remedies.

For the best in health information, subscribe to The Best Years in Life Newsletter featuring articles by Tony M. Isaacs

Subscribe to The Best Years in Lifeand The Oleandersoup Forum - Free Subscription

Powered by health.groups.yahoo.com

Mountain Rose Herbs. A Herbs, Health & Harmony Com

 

 

 

The Best Years in Life* P O Box 121 * Cooper * TX * 75432
Phone: 972-494-6263
Email: Dquixote1217[at]gmail.com- (replace [at] with @)